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Art Los Angeles Contemporary

The Hollywood Athletic Club

6525 Sunset Boulevard

February 13 - 16, 2020

Josh Reames F-It, 2019

Josh Reames
F-It, 2019
Oil, acrylic, celluclay, sawdust on canvas
60 x 50 in.

Josh Reames Fukengruven, 2019

Josh Reames
Fukengruven, 2019
Oil, acrylic, celluclay, sawdust on canvas
78 x 66 in.

Josh Reames Issues, 2020

Josh Reames
Issues, 2020
Oil, acrylic, celluclay, sawdust on canvas
78 x 66 in.

Josh Reames No Problem, 2020

Josh Reames
No Problem, 2020
Oil, acrylic, celluclay, sawdust on canvas
60 x 50 in.

Josh Reames Obscure Obfuscation, 2019

Josh Reames
Obscure Obfuscation, 2019
Acrylic on canvas
78 x 66 in.

Erik Olson Kerry, 2020

Erik Olson
Kerry, 2020
OIl and oil stick on canvas
48 x 36 in.

Erik Olson Self Portrait, 2020

Erik Olson
Self Portrait, 2020
OIl and oil stick on canvas
​48 x 36 in.

Erik Olson Lovers on the Kirchner Carpet, 2020

Erik Olson
Lovers on the Kirchner Carpet, 2020
OIl and oil stick on canvas
​48 x 36 in.

Erik Olson James Kirkpatrick (double sided portrait, Kajda on reverse), 2020

Erik Olson
James Kirkpatrick (double sided portrait, Kajda on reverse), 2020
Oil and oil stick on canvas
12 x 9.5 in.

Erik Olson Antoine, 2020

Erik Olson
Antoine, 2020
Oil and oil stick on canvas
12 x 9.5 in.

Erik Olson Laura, 2020

Erik Olson
Laura, 2020
Oil and oil stick on canvas
12 x 9.5 in.

Press Release

Luis De Jesus Los Angeles is very pleased to announce our participation in the tenth edition of Art Los Angeles Contemporaryin its new location at The Hollywood Athletic Club with a presentation of new paintings by Düsseldorf-based Erik Olson and New York-based Josh Reames. 

Erik Olson renders people and experiences that are familiar and new as he moves through the world questioning presumptions and perceptions of reality through paint. The figures that populate his canvases are likened to characters in mystery plays, each flaunting their own constructed personas and exuberant color. For Olson, each portrait is a means to express many attributes or identities in one person simultaneously.

Josh Reames’ new "bumper sticker paintings" continue to reference a vocabulary of transient signs and symbols, untethered in space and anchored by visual and textual puns. The paintings are frequently structured ways that reflect what is seen on a computer screen: content that is floating, often indexical, shifting, disappearing, and non-hierarchical. This familiar visual framework for almost all image, news, and information consumption is painstakingly translated through the analog process of painting.  

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